Beyond Fishing

Working Parties
Dates of working parties will be displayed on notice boards and in the local press. No fishing will be permitted whilst working parties are in progress. Unofficial swim creation or clearance of bank side shrubs and trees is not permitted but participation on working parties is encouraged

The Association’s members are custodians of the waters on behalf of the riparian owners and have a duty to safeguard the habitat for all wildlife that is present. Whenever you visit any of our waters, please ensure that your swim is left clean of litter and any discarded line or terminal tackle is removed for proper disposal. Do not wait for working parties to take place, your quick action may save the life of an animal and prevent any hostile press from the anti-angling lobby.


Wildlife Extravaganza
Most visitors to our waters enjoy the flora and fauna almost as much as the fishing and many of the countryside’s best loved and not so best loved creatures can be found at the waterside. Foxes, Muntjac Deer, Fallow Deer, Snakes, Squirrels, Mink, Stoats, Weasels and Rabbits are present and even the odd Terrapin. Water Voles and otters have returned to some of our stretches of river too.

Birdlife varies with the seasons but the following is just a flavour of what can be seen by the alert angler – Pheasants, Ravens, Kingfishers, Water Rails, Swans, Herons, Egrets, Mallards, Tufted Ducks, Coots, Moorhens, Gulls, Terns, Great Crested Grebes, Little Grebes, Cormorants, Blue Tits, Long Tailed Tits, Pochard, Greylag and Canada Geese, Sedge and Willow Warblers, Reed Buntings, Chaffinches, Robins, Wrens, Blackbirds, Thrushes, Cuckoos, Crows, Magpies, Jackdaws, Green, Lesser Spotted and Greater Spotted Woodpeckers, Wagtails and many others. More recently, Oyster Catchers, Redshank, Barn Owls, Great Northern Divers, Buzzards, Red Kites and even the odd Osprey have been seen.

Insect life also abounds with many rare beetles and other species can be found.

Remember, if you do not look you will not see!

The message is to enjoy your fishing but please respect the habitat of the creatures that are present in and around our fisheries. Consider the needs of wildlife that may be present before disturbing any bank side vegetation.

Good fishing and Tight Lines!

  • Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    Carp have scaleless heads and fully scaled bodies. Dorsal fin long based, free edge concave, a stout spine (with serrated rear edges as first ray) Mouth toothless but with 2 barbels at each side, second one longer. The current UK record is 64lb 14oz (all carp).

  • Chub (Leuciscus cephalus)

    Chub have a large head, a large mouth with almost rubberlike lips, a black/silver to greenish back, silvery sides, white belly, and fins tinged with yellowish red. Size and length varies depending on water. The British record was broken in May 2007 when Steve White caught a 9lb 3oz Chub.

  • The Barbel (Barbus barbus)

    Barbel have elongated bodies, almost round in cross section but flat bellied. Head pointed and scale less, eyes rather small, set high on the sides of the head, lips thick with two pairs of fleshy barbels. The current UK barbel record is 19lb 6oz.

River Carp

October 16, 2017
by: Alan DaviesNews

And Now For Something Completely Different

October 9, 2017
by: Alan DaviesNews

Carp On The Feed

September 22, 2017
by: Alan DaviesNews

Gingerbread Carp

September 11, 2017
by: Alan DaviesNews

Success at British Lure Championship

September 29, 2014
by: Kevin Goldsmith • Uncategorized

Neil blitzes Ivel chub

March 3, 2014
by: Anthony Pogmore • Uncategorized

Big pike bring some winter cheer

December 9, 2013
by: Anthony Pogmore • Uncategorized

Spectacular catches as temperatures continue to rise

April 30, 2013
by: Kevin Goldsmith • Uncategorized

Success at British Lure Championship

September 29, 2014
by: Kevin Goldsmith • Uncategorized

Neil blitzes Ivel chub

March 3, 2014
by: Anthony Pogmore • Uncategorized

Big pike bring some winter cheer

December 9, 2013
by: Anthony Pogmore • Uncategorized

Spectacular catches as temperatures continue to rise

April 30, 2013
by: Kevin Goldsmith • Uncategorized

Join the club! Click Here to see the latest catches!